How Well Do You Know Your Anatomy?

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WELCOME TO YOUR EYE!

Ever wonder exactly where your floaters are located within your eye? Well, now you can see for yourself! Below is an interactive diagram of an eye with information about how each piece of anatomy functions. You can learn about how each part of your eye plays an integral role in how you see the world! Hover your mouse over each section to learn more about it and how it may be impacting your vision.

Eye Floater Institute Eye Anatomy
Eye Floaters Floaters

Floaters are collagen protein fibers that have clumped together in the vitreous and move around your eye. Smaller clumps may not affect your vision, but larger ones cast shadows on the retina and corrupt your vision. Floaters can look like black or gray dots, squiggly lines, threadlike strands, cobwebs, or rings.
Eye Floaters Floaters

Floaters are collagen protein fibers that have clumped together in the vitreous and move around your eye. Smaller clumps may not affect your vision, but larger ones cast shadows on the retina and corrupt your vision. Floaters can look like black or gray dots, squiggly lines, threadlike strands, cobwebs, or rings.
Eye Floaters Floaters

Floaters are collagen protein fibers that have clumped together in the vitreous and move around your eye. Smaller clumps may not affect your vision, but larger ones cast shadows on the retina and corrupt your vision. Floaters can look like black or gray dots, squiggly lines, threadlike strands, cobwebs, or rings.
Eye Floaters Floaters

Floaters are collagen protein fibers that have clumped together in the vitreous and move around your eye. Smaller clumps may not affect your vision, but larger ones cast shadows on the retina and corrupt your vision. Floaters can look like black or gray dots, squiggly lines, threadlike strands, cobwebs, or rings.
Eye Floaters Floaters

Floaters are collagen protein fibers that have clumped together in the vitreous and move around your eye. Smaller clumps may not affect your vision, but larger ones cast shadows on the retina and corrupt your vision. Floaters can look like black or gray dots, squiggly lines, threadlike strands, cobwebs, or rings.
Eye Floaters Floaters

Floaters are collagen protein fibers that have clumped together in the vitreous and move around your eye. Smaller clumps may not affect your vision, but larger ones cast shadows on the retina and corrupt your vision. Floaters can look like black or gray dots, squiggly lines, threadlike strands, cobwebs, or rings.
Eye Floaters vitreous Vitreous

The vitreous is the gel-like substance that makes up most of the eye and gives it a round shape. Within the vitreous, there are collagen protein fibers that can clump together as you age. When light enters the eye, the shadows of these clumps appears as a floater in your vision.
Floaters Floaters

Floaters are collagen protein fibers that have clumped together in the vitreous and move around your eye. Smaller clumps may not affect your vision, but larger ones cast shadows on the retina and corrupt your vision. Floaters can look like black or gray dots, squiggly lines, threadlike strands, cobwebs, or rings.
Lens Lens

The lens is the transparent structure behind the pupil that helps to refract light to the back of the eye and focus it onto an image on the retina. It changes shape so that the eye can focus on objects at different distances.
Optic Nerve Optic Nerve

The optic nerve is at the very back of the eye and connects your eye to your brain. It receives impulses from the retina which instruct it to send images to the brain. If floaters have cast a shadow on the retina, those spots will block the image.
Retina Retina

When light passes through the eye, an image is formed on the retina at the back of the eye. The retina is a light-sensitive nerve layer that sends information about the image to the brain. When shadows are cast on the retina, they can appear as eye floaters.
Cornea Cornea

The cornea is the transparent circular front of the eye. It focuses light into the eye, onto the lens and then to the retina.
vitreous_img_hover Vitreous

The vitreous is the gel-like substance that makes up most of the eye and gives it a round shape. Within the vitreous, there are collagen protein fibers that can clump together as you age. When light enters the eye, the shadows of these clumps appears as a floater in your vision.
lens_img_hover Lens

The lens is the transparent structure behind the pupil that helps to refract light to the back of the eye and focus it onto an image on the retina. It changes shape so that the eye can focus on objects at different distances.
cornea_img_hover Cornea

The cornea is the transparent circular front of the eye. It focuses light into the eye, onto the lens and then to the retina.
optic_nerve_img_hover Optic Nerve

The optic nerve is at the very back of the eye and connects your eye to your brain. It receives impulses from the retina which instruct it to send images to the brain. If floaters have cast a shadow on the retina, those spots will block the image.
retina_img_hover Retina

When light passes through the eye, an image is formed on the retina at the back of the eye. The retina is a light-sensitive nerve layer that sends information about the image to the brain. When shadows are cast on the retina, they can appear as eye floaters.
Eyes Anatomy
Vitreous
Lens
Cornea
Floaters
Optic Nerve
Retina

Eye Floater Institute